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Adnexal (ovaries and surrounding tissue) masses are rarely seen in pediatric and adolescent period and are usually benign. The most common are those in the follicle and corpus luteum cysts (hatching of the ovaries or cysts due to the hormones from the mother) and recover spontaneously. Of course, less frequently malignant masses can be seen. The most common presenting complaint is abdominal pain, palpable mass, bloating, digestive system problems, vaginal bleeding, premature puberty, symptoms of LUTS and some hormonal disorders can be reason of admittance.

Surgical approach is rarely needed in adnexal masses, surgery is planned for the masses above 8cm and fast-growing masses, masses including solid areas with high tumor markers.

Torsion of adnexal mass (development of gangrene by turning around its stem) are very important and should not be omitted in patients presenting abdominal pain.  Probability of inaccurate diagnosis is high but delaying surgical interventions may result in loss of the ovary. Colicky abdominal pain, is a severe pain that comes and goes. Nausea, vomiting, high fever, leukocytosis (white blood cell increase) and acute abdominal findings (examination findings requiring surgical intervention) can be seen. Absence of blood flow in the ovaries on ultrasound is helpful in diagnosis, but torsion can be seen in cases where blood flow is present.  Generally, ovary preserving surgery is preferred, adnexa is detortioned,  expect the ovary return to its normal color and if there is cyst, it is removed. Rarely, removal of ovary may be required, too. Some studies show that gynecologists prefer it more frequently than pediatric surgeons since reproduction problems are most likely to occur in long term  due to removal of ovary.